Photographing Ice Hockey

PLEASE NOTE: I have moved my blog to a more permanent location. You can now read this story, and keep up with all of my posts here

I got my first chance to shoot ice hockey a few days ago. A friend of mine has a son who plays and I finally pestered him enough that he told me that I could come and shoot at a regional tournament being held at the rink where his son plays. Before going, I knew 3 things: Continue reading “Photographing Ice Hockey”

Family Picture Time

PLEASE NOTE: I have moved my blog to a more permanent location. You can now read this story, and keep up with all of my posts here

I remember as a kid, dressing up for family pictures, going to a studio (or Sears) and being told to lower my chin, tilt my head and place my hand somewhere. Then, once I had assumed this unnatural posture, I was to remain perfectly still. And smile. And relax. And wait until my brothers and parents all cooperated in the same way. Getting 5 chins in just the right place can be a challenge.

Family pictures, I think, should represent the family. As they are. I know that most Moms don’t want to hear that. Most Moms want family pictures that represent the family as we would like for it to be: cooperative, orderly, happy.

Life is usually a little messier than that. I give you exhibit A. Here’s a great family. And in this moment, we were all on the same page.

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Then, somebody said, or did, something silly. And it all began to break down. Continue reading “Family Picture Time”

Expectations in Photography

PLEASE NOTE: I have moved my blog to a more permanent location. You can now read this story, and keep up with all of my posts here

A good friend, with a rather negative outlook on life, once said to me, “The problem that you optimists have is that you are often disappointed. You’re always expecting the best, and when it doesn’t pan out, you are let down. I, on the other hand, never expect the best, so I am often pleasantly surprised!”

There is, I suppose, some truth is what he said; though he still didn’t convince me to move over to the dark side. I continue to expect the best and, truth be told, things usually do work out pretty well. There are exceptions, of course. Continue reading “Expectations in Photography”

The Battle of Huck’s Defeat – 2018

PLEASE NOTE: I have moved my blog to a more permanent location. You can now read this story, and keep up with all of my posts here

I’ve begun volunteering with our local museums. The Cultural & Heritage Museums of York County, South Carolina is a family of four separate museums, including Historic Brattonsville, a 775-acre Revolutionary War site. One of the highlights of the year at Brattonsville is the reenactment of the Battle of Huck’s Defeat. I’ll leave the facts and significance of the battle to the experts and focus our attention here on the reenactment and the photographic opportunities it presents.

Kevin Lynch, the site manager at Brattonsville, describes the home site as a “target rich environment” for photographers. Candid portraits of historic interpreters, landscape photographs, architecture, wildlife, macro and still life images are everywhere, even when there isn’t a special event.

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Continue reading “The Battle of Huck’s Defeat – 2018”

Hemlock Falls – It’s a matter of perspective

PLEASE NOTE: I have moved my blog to a more permanent location. You can now read this story, and keep up with all of my posts here

When I first began to try to take pictures of landscapes, I would inevitably try to capture an image of wide, sweeping vistas. You know, those epic mountain ranges, or cloudscapes or tree lines.  Somehow, what I saw with my eye never quite appeared on the back of my camera after I took the shot. Since then I have learned a bit more about cameras and specific lenses and how they “see”. In a nutshell, I can tell you that they don’t see like our eyes do.  More importantly, I have learned that I rarely want a picture of that wide scene anyway. I try (and often fail) to ask myself “What, exactly, am I taking a picture of, anyway?”

I mentioned in a previous post that a group of photographers can stand in front of the same scene and come away with completely different images. Each will represent that photographer’s point of view, or tell the story that he wants to communicate. I was reminded of this when I read reports on the photographs that came out the recent G7 meetings in Canada. Same event. Different photographic perspectives.

Last week I had a chance to wander down into Cloudland Canyon in north Georgia.  There are two waterfalls in the canyon, and I was hoping to be able to capture at least one of them. As it turned out, I was able to spend a fair amount of time at Hemlock Falls. The other, Cherokee Falls, was just too popular on the day that I was there. Swimmers, hikers and families enjoying an early summer day made pictures there an impossibility. Hemlock Falls is farther down the canyon – which means a longer climb coming back out – so I had more options down there. Continue reading “Hemlock Falls – It’s a matter of perspective”

Why Go to a Photography Workshop?

Let’s face it. There are a hundred ways to learn new things. Well, maybe there are really only three or four, but one of those ways is “online”, and there are hundreds of places online to learn just about anything. Want to learn math, or cooking, or French or how to change your oil? No problem. A quick Google search and a few YouTube videos later you are on your way.

Of course you can still learn by taking a class, or reading a book, or watching someone else in real life. You can even pick up the old “trial and error” method if you would like. You’ll learn something.

But, for me at least, there is very little that replaces the accelerated learning process that happens at a workshop. My biggest strides in photography – or at least what I have learned about photography – have always happened in a group educational session. Especially when that session involves “hands-on” opportunities. I’ve taken a few classes that are set up that way, attended an outstanding lighting class with Tony Corbell at the South Carolina Lamarr School, and have even done a couple of group activities around Charlotte. Continue reading “Why Go to a Photography Workshop?”

Your own backyard

Iceland, Croatia, Norway, the Faroe Islands, Peru, Oregon, Utah, the list could go on. In no particular order, these are places that I would love to visit with my camera. I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to spend a small amount of time in a couple of those spots, and those visits did nothing but whet my appetite to return. You’ve probably seen breathtaking photographs taken in some of those places. There’s a reason that so many photographers spend so much time and money to get to them. So, I find myself relating to the duck in the picture above, trying to paddle my way back to Mt. Hood.

The reality, however, is that those kind of trips are few and far between for me. I will never see some of the places that I think about visiting. And that’s alright. There’s plenty of stuff to shoot right around here. Continue reading “Your own backyard”