Family Picture Time

I remember as a kid, dressing up for family pictures, going to a studio (or Sears) and being told to lower my chin, tilt my head and place my hand somewhere. Then, once I had assumed this unnatural posture, I was to remain perfectly still. And smile. And relax. And wait until my brothers and parents all cooperated in the same way. Getting 5 chins in just the right place can be a challenge.

Family pictures, I think, should represent the family. As they are. I know that most Moms don’t want to hear that. Most Moms want family pictures that represent the family as we would like for it to be: cooperative, orderly, happy.

Life is usually a little messier than that. I give you exhibit A. Here’s a great family. And in this moment, we were all on the same page.

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Then, somebody said, or did, something silly. And it all began to break down. Continue reading “Family Picture Time”

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Week 4: Headshot

The 52 Week Photography challenge, as composed by Dogwood Photography, rotates between three categories: portraits, landscapes and artistic shots. On the fourth week, then, we are back at our first category: portraits. This week’s challenge was to take a headshot. As they said, “You shot a selfie, now shoot a “selfie” of someone else!”

My week 1 self portrait was done in the traditional style of a headshot: bright, white background. fairly sterile. I wanted this week’s version to be a little more refined and stylized. To be refined, I had to start with a different model! For that matter, in order to complete the assignment I had to find a different model. Fortunately I have a patient wife who was a willing candidate and she happened to need a headshot for work. Two birds, and all that. Continue reading “Week 4: Headshot”

Week 1: Self Portrait

So the challenge has begun, and so far I am 1 for 1. I’ve gotten the first shot of my 52 week photography challenge under my belt. And I killed a few other bird in the process.

This week’s challenge was “Self Portrait”. Frankly, most photographers pick up a camera so that they can stay behind it, but self portraits are beneficial for a number of reasons. One, they let you shoot people, even when there are no people around. So when you are testing a new setup, or lens, or light or whatever, you can work out some of the kinks before you involve a model or a client. Two, they give you some sense of what your models have to go through. The next time you say “chin down”, or “angle your shoulders”, or “smile with your eyes”, you may have a little more empathy for them, and a little more clarity in your instructions. Three, it provides you with a new profile picture for social media. At least it will for me. Continue reading “Week 1: Self Portrait”